Possibly a game changer. Japan set out a hydrogen dream as to respond to the emerging threats on energy security and carbon emission restriction. As the Tokyo Olympic Games 2020 approaches, the city strives to demonstrate to the world the potential of a hydrogen economy.

Tokyo

Due to the geographic constrains that are ill-suited to large scale production of renewable electricity, and the aftermath of the meltdowns of Fukushima nuclear plant, Japan is left with few options to reduce its carbon emission.

Japan has shown a strong enthusiasm on transforming to a hydrogen economy, one that would produce affordable hydrogen fuel cells to convert the hydrogen to electricity to power the vehicular fleet.

With a current fleet of 1,400 buses serving in Tokyo, the Government plans to deploy 15 hydrogen buses in service during Olympic Games 2020.

Factors for Success

It is yet to judge whether the hydrogen economy will succeed.

Policy drive
Due to energy security and carbon emission restriction, the Japan’s Ministry of economy, trade and industry has launched the Basic Hydrogen Strategy in 2017 outlining the national vision for the future of a hydrogen society. The Strategy covers a plan to develop and commericalize International hydrogen supply chains by 2025 to 2030.

Key challenges
There are obvious key challenges for hydrogen fuel to go economy of scale amidst international fuel market and bring down the cost on hydrogen infrastructure.

Environmental Impact

The estimated impact on environment is significant as hydrogen fuel cell vehicles should produce minimal level of exhaust air pollution and carbon emission.

Latest Updates

August 09 2022 | PF

Roadside air pollution in Hong Kong is at dangerous levels, causing harm to public health. Reducing...

May 11 2022 | PF

With some franchised bus operators launching new electric buses in the last fortnight,...

April 20 2022 | PF

Severe roadside air pollution in Hong Kong is threatening public health. The major source of...

Other Cities

Shenzhen

China

Shenzhen

China

A pioneer on e-bus. China set out a new energy vehicle program at 2009 to invest on vehicle and infrastructure in 10+ pilot cities. Shenzhen's route to full 100% electric bus fleet yielded valuable insights. Now, the city operates the largest electric bus fleet in the world with more than 16,000 buses.

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore

A visionary master plan. Singapore launched its Master Plan 2040 to envision how might a transport system should be designed to support a healthier and cleaner country. The Plan opens up doors for transformation of the bus fleet to clean energy.

London

United Kingdom

London

United Kingdom

Mayor led the change. The London Mayor has stepped up to lead a move to tackle air pollution and public health threat by transforming its buses to zero emission. Now the city operates the largest e-bus fleet in Europe.